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Author: Andrew Dalglish

  1. Using Regression Analysis in market research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    When measuring the health of customer relationships, three metrics are at the core of most studies: customer satisfaction, customer loyalty (likelihood of choosing supplier at next purchase) and customer advocacy (likelihood of recommending supplier to others).

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  2. Driving action from a customer satisfaction programme

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Most companies have a customer satisfaction research programme in place, but not all are made equal.  Some are active agents of change – they spur the organisation to act, building stronger customer relationships, boosting customer loyalty and ultimately improving commercial performance.  Others are passive observers – they simply report on the situation but do little to change it.  So, how do you ensure that your customer satisfaction programme makes a positive difference?

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  3. How to measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    How do you measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets?  What questions should you ask in a customer satisfaction survey?

    Fair questions, but first ask yourself this: should you measure customer satisfaction?  It’s counter-intuitive, but in B2B markets sometimes customer satisfaction doesn’t actually matter.  For example, even disgruntled customers may remain loyal because:

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  4. Net Promoter Score (NPS) in B2B – the evidence

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Net Promoter Score (NPS).  It’s the one number that almost every organisation seems to include in their management metrics and it’s easy to see why.

    In the original Harvard Business Review paper where NPS was revealed to the world, its ‘inventor’, Frederick Reichheld, made some bold claims.  Discussing his analysis of the link between a company’s NPS score and their commercial performance, Reichheld said: “The results were striking…a strong correlation existed between net promoter figures and a company’s average growth rate over the three-year period from 1999 to 2002”.  This link has become received wisdom in the business world with many believing that a focus on improving NPS is a sure fire path to commercial success.

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  5. SMEs in the UK – key facts and statistics

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    There are 2.44 million small businesses (SMEs) in the UK.   That makes them of great interest to those who govern the country as SMEs employ of 59% of the UK workforce.  It also means that the Government is constantly collecting information about SMEs and all that data is of great value to a second group with a particular interest in small businesses – B2B organisations.  After all, SMEs represent a sizeable market in need of a vast array of B2B products and services.

    That data can be a bit impenetrable though, so to save some time you might want to check out the infographic below which summarises some key facts about SMEs in the UK…

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  6. Calculating Net Promoter Score (NPS) in B2B markets

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Net Promoter Score (NPS) is perhaps the most widely used metric in customer satisfaction and loyalty research.  Here at Circle, our view is that NPS isn’t always the best metric in B2B environments (we explain why here), but it does have a role to play.  So, assuming it is the right metric for your business, how do you calculate Net Promoter Score (NPS)?

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  7. The secrets of successful B2B marketing

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    What’s the secret to successful marketing?  A recent survey by B2B Marketing and Circle Research asked 104 client-side B2B marketers that very question – ‘what would you say are the key elements to successful B2B marketing?’.  They were given free rein to answer however they wanted and an analysis of these responses reveals five themes.

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  8. Incentives in B2B market research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    One of the toughest aspects of conducting a B2B research study is securing the support of a hard-to-reach target audience.  B2B decision makers are time poor, under pressure and protected by Gatekeepers (e.g. their PA).  These are all features which make them less likely to take part in surveys and interviews, but with the right approach B2B respondents can be persuaded to take part in research.

    So, what’s the trick?

    Well, it’s all about careful incentivisation – you need to give respondents a compelling reason to support the research.  In a recent article for Research Live, Circle Research’s Andrew Dalglish explored this topic revealing how you can use ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ incentives to access the opinions of B2B audiences.

    Read the article in full here.

  9. The data asteroid is coming

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    They say that an asteroid impact wiped dinosaurs off the face of the earth. Could data be the B2B marketer’s asteroid?

    At a basic level, data can reveal the effectiveness of and ROI from marketing investments. What was the click-through rate? How many leads were generated? Which executions generated the most engagement? But this ‘what happened?’ data is just scratching the surface. Data can be used not just to observe what happens, but to shape what happens. With the right approach to data capture and analysis, insights with the potential to turbo-charge marketing activity can be brought to the surface. Data mining can reveal hidden opportunities, predictive analytics can put you one step ahead, micro-segmentation can personalise your marketing, and so on.

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