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Author: Andrew Dalglish

  1. Secrets of the fastest growing B2B marketing agencies

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    B2B marketing agencies are in rude health.  The B2B Agencies Benchmarking Report reveals that 62% of agency leaders (we spoke to 75 of them from the UK’s leading players) describe their commercial performance in 2016 as ‘good’ and a further 26% report that it was ‘strong’.  Their financial numbers reflect this confidence.  85% of agencies have grown revenues year-on-year, with an average increase in Gross Income of 9% and an average rise of 31% in Net Profit.  To fuel this, the number of people employed by agencies has jumped by 19% year-on-year.

    But some agencies out-perform even these healthy benchmarks.  What’s their secret?

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  2. B2B marketing agencies optimistic about BREXIT

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    I’ve been rummaging around the data underpinning this year’s B2B Agencies Benchmarking Report and was pleased to see how healthy the agency community is.

    Ask agency leaders (we spoke to 75 of them from the UK’s leading players) about their commercial performance in 2016 and the response is overwhelmingly positive.  62% describe it as ‘good’ and a further 26% report that it was ‘strong’.  Their financial numbers reflect this confidence.  85% of agencies have grown revenues year-on-year, with an average increase in Gross Income of 9% and an average rise of 31% in Net Profit.  To fuel this, the number of people employed by agencies has jumped by 19% year-on-year.

    Things might be rosy just now, but is BREXIT about to disrupt the agency world?

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  3. Business-to-business (B2B) pricing strategy research – part 2

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Last week I discussed two research techniques which can be used when determining the optimum pricing strategy – Gabor-Granger and Brand Price Trade Off (BPTO).  These techniques are beautifully simple, but this simplicity has a flip side.

    • The choice may be over-simplified and no longer reflect real-life decision scenarios which can be complex and based on a series of conscious and unconscious trade-offs
    • With the linear raising or lowering of prices, respondents can easily guess what the researcher is doing and may be tempted to ‘game’ the result
    • Prompting respondents with an initial price point will frame their subsequent responses and thus under- or over-estimate the true price they’d be willing to pay
    • Only allowing a binary ‘would buy/wouldn’t buy’ response doesn’t capture important shades in between where people start to become more or less comfortable with a particular price point

    This week, I’ll look at two pricing research techniques which can overcome these issues – the Van Westendorp Price Sensitivity Meter and Conjoint Analysis.

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  4. Business-to-business (B2B) pricing strategy research – part 1

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    When developing the optimum pricing strategy in business-to-business (B2B) markets, it’s essential to have insights into how the market is likely to react when a product or service is sold at different price points.  That’s where market research comes in.  It informs pricing strategy by revealing likely levels of demand, revenue and profitability under different pricing scenarios.

    There are four main techniques used in pricing research and I’ll explore them all in this and my next blog post (all in plain English, with real-life examples you’ll be pleased to hear).  This week I take a look at the Gabor-Granger and Brand Price Trade Off (BPTO) techniques.

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  5. Brand mapping – Correspondence Analysis explained

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Which attributes most closely define your brand?  Which other brands are challenging you for this space?  How differentiated is your brand and where might there be white space?

    These are all critical questions for a marketer or indeed anyone managing a brand, but answering them isn’t always straightforward, as the following example illustrates.  It’s from a real-life study of how buyers of corporate IT systems perceive different vendor brands.

    In this survey we asked buyers whether they associated our client’s brand and thirteen competitors with ten attributes which previous qualitative research had identified as important in this market.  For each attribute, their answer could either be that they did associate the brand with it, or they didn’t. Continue reading

  6. Using Regression Analysis in market research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    When measuring the health of customer relationships, three metrics are at the core of most studies: customer satisfaction, customer loyalty (likelihood of choosing supplier at next purchase) and customer advocacy (likelihood of recommending supplier to others).

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  7. How to measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    How do you measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets?  What questions should you ask in a customer satisfaction survey?

    Fair questions, but first ask yourself this: should you measure customer satisfaction?  It’s counter-intuitive, but in B2B markets sometimes customer satisfaction doesn’t actually matter.  For example, even disgruntled customers may remain loyal because:

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  8. B2B customer loyalty – five segments

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Customer loyalty is critical to any business.  Obvious but true, especially for B2B companies who, unlike their consumer focused counterparts, have a relatively limited pool of buyers to target.

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  9. Net Promoter Score (NPS) in B2B – the evidence

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Net Promoter Score (NPS).  It’s the one number that almost every organisation seems to include in their management metrics and it’s easy to see why.

    In the original Harvard Business Review paper where NPS was revealed to the world, its ‘inventor’, Frederick Reichheld, made some bold claims.  Discussing his analysis of the link between a company’s NPS score and their commercial performance, Reichheld said: “The results were striking…a strong correlation existed between net promoter figures and a company’s average growth rate over the three-year period from 1999 to 2002”.  This link has become received wisdom in the business world with many believing that a focus on improving NPS is a sure fire path to commercial success.

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  10. SMEs in the UK – key facts and statistics

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    There are 2.44 million small businesses (SMEs) in the UK.   That makes them of great interest to those who govern the country as SMEs employ of 59% of the UK workforce.  It also means that the Government is constantly collecting information about SMEs and all that data is of great value to a second group with a particular interest in small businesses – B2B organisations.  After all, SMEs represent a sizeable market in need of a vast array of B2B products and services.

    That data can be a bit impenetrable though, so to save some time you might want to check out the infographic below which summarises some key facts about SMEs in the UK…

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