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News & Views

  1. When and how to use B2B social media

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Ed Weatherall of the IDM recently likened Twitter to the Emperor’s New Clothes.  It’s surrounded by hype but when we look closely it often has limited relevance in B2B.  This bold position could explain why Ed was Happy Slapped to publicise last year’s B2B Marketing Awards.

    Despite the risk of suffering the same fate I’d like to join the campaign for common sense.

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  2. Maximising B2B survey response rates

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    DIY research has been a hot topic recently.  Being agency side you’d expect me to dismiss the idea.  I don’t.  I think it has a role and sometimes makes good sense.  I also think there’s a growing realisation that this research lark is not as easy as it first seems.

    Surely all you have to do is write a questionnaire, source a database of relevant contacts and then survey them using an online tool like Surveymonkey or by making a few calls?  Simple.  In theory, yes.  In practice, no.

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  3. Measuring the role of emotion in B2B decision making

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    I received this question by email recently.

    “B2B marketers don’t target companies, they target people who make decisions for these companies.  People being people, these decisions have rational and emotional components.  Research often focuses on the rational part but forgets the emotional bit.  How can we ensure both dimensions are represented?”

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  4. How to tell if a B2B survey is reliable

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    We recently asked readers to pose their research questions on the B2B Marketing LinkedIn group.  One question came back more than once.  “In a B2B context how can I ensure a survey is reliable?”.  A big question but let me give it a shot.

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  5. The pros and cons of DIY research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    This month sees two milestones; a new year and the first anniversary of this blog featuring in B2B Marketing Magazine.  What better time for a bit of re-invention.  The column should be relevant to the issues you face and those you’re curious about.  It should also ideally be a discussion.  So here’s the idea.  Each month I’ll create a thread on the B2B Marketing LinkedIn group where you can post a specific research dilemma, general question or just any interesting observations.  One or some of these comments will then form the focus for the column and hopefully subsequent discussion on the B2B Marketing blog.

    To get things moving the first question comes courtesy of a response to B2B Marketing’s Editor Joel.  “What are the pro’s and cons of DIY B2B research?”

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  6. The 3 I’s of new product development research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    “If I’d asked people what they wanted they’d have said faster horses” declared father of the motor car Henry Ford.  Fast forward a century to another great innovator, co-founder of Apple Steve Jobs.  “It’s really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them”.  If we take these comments at face value they suggest that customer opinion can’t be the source of paradigm shifting NPD.

    But I think Ford and Jobs have been misconstrued; their comments have been taken too superficially.

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  7. Lessons in brand trust

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    I recently stumbled across the Reader’s Digest survey of Britain’s most trusted brands.  One finding jumped out at me.  The most trustworthy margarine is Flora.  “I’ve never trusted a margarine” I thought.  “I trust my doctor, my friends, my local policeman; not a margarine”.  But the idea got me thinking.

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  8. International B2B research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    There’s an international flavour at the moment.  The holiday season is still a fresh memory,  global political tensions are simmering and the world economy is diverging into three streams – ever expanding emerging markets led by China, countries such as Germany just breaking out of recession and countries like the UK where growth remains subdued.

    For a B2B business international expansion has always been attractive as it compensates for the limited number of buyers in any one country.  This is now the case more than ever.  The economy may remain depressed at home, but abroad it seems to be on the up.  Caution is key though; the rewards may be great but so are the risks.

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  9. Survey or crystal ball: Surveys and economic forecasting

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    My friends think I’m odd.  It’s unusual, they say, to become animated when talking about business.  It was with a resigned sigh then that they accepted my invitation for an ‘end of recession’ celebration drink in our local.  There was also grumbling at the last minute nature of the invite.  A sensible precaution I thought.  The October celebration was hastily repositioned as a commiseration drink when GDP figures failed to back up economists’ estimates of an early exit from recession.  I suspect you, the reader, are also starting to think I’m a little odd so I’ll cut to the chase.

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  10. Finding the pricing sweet spot

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Perhaps unsurprisingly in the current climate, marketers are increasingly looking at price and pricing mechanisms as a means of obtaining competitive differentiation.  But there’s a lot more to price than simply being the cheapest.  It should ideally reach the optimum price point or ‘sweet spot’.  It must be perceived as fair.  But especially in today’s conditions it must clearly reflect and communicate value.

    Of course there are many alternative approaches to pricing research, but we take a very straightforward view.  Price is really only determined by one thing – what the buyer is prepared to pay.

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