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Category: News

  1. Understanding brand personality through projective techniques

    By Graeme Cade -

    Most brands have a set of human traits associated with them – a brand personality.   In B2B markets brand personality is an especially important concept as ‘corporate fit’ is often an important consideration for B2B buyers – “are these people on my wavelength and can I see myself working with them?”

    You can shape your corporate brand personality through marketing communications and, most importantly, by developing an appropriate corporate culture. But to do that effectively, you first need to understand what kind of brand personality appeals to buyers and how your brand is perceived in relation to this.

    That’s not straightforward. Continue reading

  2. Branding terminology and jargon explained

    By Beth Pearson -

    Jargon abounds in the discipline of branding, and the plethora of terms in use coupled with the sometimes nuanced differences between them can have undesirable side effects.  Sometimes the jargon undermines the user, making them seem pretentious or detached from the hard-nosed world of commerce.  And other times conversations will become increasingly confused as terms are used interchangeably or different meanings attached to the same words by different people. Continue reading

  3. The benefits of a strong brand in B2B markets

    By Beth Pearson -

    Some don’t think that branding matters in B2B markets.  They say that B2B decision makers are logical beings immune to any such irrational influences.  And anyway, it’s all just fluffy marketing crap and a brand is really just a logo isn’t it?

    B2B marketers disagree.  In fact, our surveys have found that 77% of B2B marketing leaders believe that branding is critical to growth. Continue reading

  4. The cost of losing a customer

    By David Willan -

    What’s the cost of losing a customer?  ‘A lot’ is the simple answer, especially in B2B markets where the pool of prospective customers is limited and each sale tends to be high value.

    We can be a bit more specific about the cost of losing a customer though.

    Continue reading

  5. Using Regression Analysis in market research

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    When measuring the health of customer relationships, three metrics are at the core of most studies: customer satisfaction, customer loyalty (likelihood of choosing supplier at next purchase) and customer advocacy (likelihood of recommending supplier to others).

    Continue reading

  6. Driving action from a B2B customer satisfaction survey

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Most B2B companies have a customer satisfaction survey programme in place, but not all are made equal.  Some customer satisfaction surveys are active agents of change – they spur the organisation to act, building stronger customer relationships, boosting customer loyalty and ultimately improving commercial performance.  Others customer satisfaction surveys are passive observers – they simply report on the situation but do little to change it.  So, how do you ensure that your customer satisfaction survey makes a positive difference?

    Continue reading

  7. How to measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    How do you measure customer satisfaction in B2B markets?  What questions should you ask in a customer satisfaction survey?

    Fair questions, but first ask yourself this: should you measure customer satisfaction?  It’s counter-intuitive, but in B2B markets sometimes customer satisfaction doesn’t actually matter.  For example, even disgruntled customers may remain loyal because:

    Continue reading

  8. B2B customer loyalty – five segments

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Customer loyalty is critical to any business.  Obvious but true, especially for B2B companies who, unlike their consumer focused counterparts, have a relatively limited pool of buyers to target.

    Continue reading

  9. Net Promoter Score (NPS) in B2B – the evidence

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    Net Promoter Score (NPS).  It’s the one number that almost every organisation seems to include in their management metrics and it’s easy to see why.

    In the original Harvard Business Review paper where NPS was revealed to the world, its ‘inventor’, Frederick Reichheld, made some bold claims.  Discussing his analysis of the link between a company’s NPS score and their commercial performance, Reichheld said: “The results were striking…a strong correlation existed between net promoter figures and a company’s average growth rate over the three-year period from 1999 to 2002”.  This link has become received wisdom in the business world with many believing that a focus on improving NPS is a sure fire path to commercial success.

    Continue reading

  10. SMEs in the UK – key facts and statistics

    By Andrew Dalglish -

    There are 2.44 million small businesses (SMEs) in the UK.   That makes them of great interest to those who govern the country as SMEs employ of 59% of the UK workforce.  It also means that the Government is constantly collecting information about SMEs and all that data is of great value to a second group with a particular interest in small businesses – B2B organisations.  After all, SMEs represent a sizeable market in need of a vast array of B2B products and services.

    That data can be a bit impenetrable though, so to save some time you might want to check out the infographic below which summarises some key facts about SMEs in the UK…

    Continue reading